Academic: ‘Kids, start with a ¼ pill when taking ecstasy’

An academic has been branded “irresponsible” for suggesting that teenagers should be taught how to take Class A drugs ‘safely’.

Valerie Curran, Professor of Psychopharmacology at University College London, said young people should be told to split ecstasy tablets into quarters before consuming them.

Prominent anti-drugs campaigner Mary Brett said her advice amounts to “condoning an illegal activity”.

See what happens

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Curran was asked about a recent study which found consumption of ecstasy, also known as MDMA, is increasing.

In order to ensure the ‘safety’ of drug users, she suggested they should take it in stages.

“Take one of the quarters and wait two hours and see what happens”, she added.

Green light

Responding to her comments, Mary Brett of anti-drugs charity Cannabis Skunk Sense, said Curran’s comments were “very irresponsible”.

“She was talking about giving young children tips on how to do drugs safely”.

“MDMA is illegal. She is condoning an illegal activity. If you give harm reduction advice to kids it acts as a green light.”


Ecstasy can cause anxiety, panic attacks, psychosis and paranoia, as well as kidney and liver poisoning.

According to the Office for National Statistics, between 1996 and 2014 it was recorded on the death certificate of more than 650 people.

A young man who nearly died after taking the drug pleaded with people on Facebook last year saying “don’t get sucked in”.

Say no to drugs

Jordy Hurdes, who was battling with severe muscle spasms, called on others to “be the stronger person and say no to the drugs” in a shocking video.

Thank you so much for the love and support from everyone. I honestly can not believe how much the post has gone viral. Please share this video. The more that can see this. The more lives can be saved

He said that taking drugs such as ecstasy “seems like a fun option”, but urged people not to because they too could face similar traumas.

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