11-year-olds set to debate rape, prostitution and porn

School children as young as eleven could be given lessons about rape, prostitution and pornography, but critics have warned that the lessons are “too explicit” for youngsters.

Charity Rape Crisis has released educational packs for secondary schools, which can be bought for £100, as part of a campaign to end violence against women.

They will prompt pupils to debate issues surrounding rape, and will also encourage them to act out a role play, which includes obscene language, where a boy and girl recall a drunken encounter.

Irresponsible

But Nick Seaton, from the Campaign for Real Education, has criticised the scheme, saying: “It is irresponsible because it is certainly not suitable for young children and probably not for older children either.

“Just because these things happen does not mean that children need to have them rammed in their faces.

“Sensible parents will be extremely perturbed that their children are being introduced to this sort of information at a young age.”

Myths

The controversial packs will encourage children to debate myths such as “women enjoy rape”, and “women ask for it by wearing short skirts”.

The packs will also cover topics such as genital mutilation, forced marriage and human trafficking.

Laura Colclough, author of the education packs, defended the scheme, saying that children are already sexualised, and that teachers are expected to use their discretion in deciding what to teach.

Sexualised

She said: “Gone are the days when young people are not sexualised. Most, if not all, see the music videos. They see the culture and they surf the internet.

“It’s not from an angle of supporting sexuality or pornography but critically evaluating it.”

The educational packs have been produced by the charity’s Wycombe, Chiltern and South Buckinghamshire branch, and are designed for use in secondary schools.

Character

Last week it was revealed that health chiefs in Southampton had created a children’s character, Charlie Condom, to promote condoms to 13-year-olds.

But critics warned that the scheme would simply normalise underage sex.

Ron Clooney, from the teachers union NASUWT, criticised the scheme, saying: “This method, where underage impressionable teenagers can get condoms so openly, condones the idea of underage sex.

“Having a giant condom launching this is ridiculous. This needs to be treated as a serious subject. No amount of silly characters with condoms on their heads are going to cure the issue.”

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