Star of TV’s Poirot records audio Bible

Christian actor David Suchet, best known for playing TV detective Hercule Poirot, has recorded the entire NIV Bible to be released this Easter.

Suchet, who spent over 200 hours in the recording studio while also filming his detective TV series, said the project was a “27-year ambition”.

The 78-hour recording will be the first full-length audio Bible spoken by a single British actor.

Ambition

Suchet said: “I thought well one thing I can do, or I think I can do, is to read and I’ve for many years felt that I wanted to put my voice to the Bible.

“It will for me, fulfil what I suppose is a 27-year ambition”, he added.

In a video interview Suchet explained how, after his conversion to Christianity in 1986, he wanted to use his gifts to share his faith.

Paul the apostle

Ray Bruce, who worked with Suchet on the project, told The Guardian: “He always arrived prepared, for three-hour sessions” and “then he went on to perform on stage”.

Bruce and Suchet had previously worked together on a two-part video series for BBC1 titled The Footsteps of Paul.

The actor particularly identifies with the apostle because he became a believer after reading Romans chapter eight in a hotel room one night, according to The Guardian.

Labour of love

Ian Metcalfe, director of the publishing firm, which will release the recording said: “I am delighted the whole thing came together”.

“It is a labour of love, and so much of a benefit to everyone”, he added.

The recording will be available this Easter on CD and other digital formats including Ebooks enhanced by Suchet’s recording.

Other works featuring Suchet’s voice include an Ebook on the epistles and one on the Gospels.

Hercule Poirot

Suchet, 67, portrayed Agatha Christie’s Belgian detective on TV for 25 years. The final episode aired last November.

Speaking of how crime drama has changed over the years he said, “it’s become very dark and extraordinarily violent”.

“That’s not the world of Agatha Christie and the fact that he’s still so popular must say a lot about the public – that they actually don’t need the blood and gore and the sex and the drama”, he added.